Monday, July 24, 2017

BacterioFiles 303 - Sticky Skin Sows Cells

Caenorhabditis elegans
By Bob Goldstein, CC BY-SA 3.0
This episode: Roundworms in soil can carry with them bacteria they eat to grow new food, like farmers!

Download Episode (11.1 MB, 12.15 minutes)

Show notes:
Microbe of the episode: Equid alphaherpesvirus 1

News item

Journal Paper:
Thutupalli S, Uppaluri S, Constable GWA, Levin SA, Stone HA, Tarnita CE, Brangwynne CP. 2017. Farming and public goods production in Caenorhabditis elegans populations. Proc Natl Acad Sci 114:2289–2294.

Other interesting stories:
  • Using modified CRISPR for quick detection of infections
  • Modifying cyanobacterium cell length to make extracting biofuels easier (paper)
  • Fusing phage proteins with antibodies to better target pathogens
  • Some amoebas can penetrate biofilms to feed on dangerous bacteria (paper)
  • Phages have some advantages over antibiotics

  • Post questions or comments here or email to bacteriofiles@gmail.com. Thanks for listening!

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    Monday, July 17, 2017

    BacterioFiles 302 - Message Moderates Microbe Mortality

    Bacillus subtilis
    By Y tambe, CCBY-SA 3.0
    This episode: Even organisms as simple as viruses can communicate with each other!

    Download Episode (12.7 MB, 13.9 minutes)

    Show notes:
    Microbe of the episode: Sweet potato virus C

    Commentary (paywall)
    Great talk about bacterial communication by Dr. Bonnie Bassler

    Journal Paper:
    Erez Z, Steinberger-Levy I, Shamir M, Doron S, Stokar-Avihail A, Peleg Y, Melamed S, Leavitt A, Savidor A, Albeck S, Amitai G, Sorek R. 2017. Communication between viruses guides lysis–lysogeny decisions. Nature 541:488–493.

    Other interesting stories:
  • Engineering gut bacteria to detect and report gut inflammation
  • Plants give fat to their root fungi in exchange for other nutrients
  • Gut microbe metabolite linked with lower risk of diabetes
  • Making bioelectrodes by embedding bacteria in glass (paper)
  • Using CRISPR to discover new drug-producing bacterial genes

  • Post questions or comments here or email to bacteriofiles@gmail.com. Thanks for listening!

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    Monday, July 10, 2017

    BacterioFiles 301 - Cells Simulate City Structures

    This episode: Ancient microbes built underwater structures that look like sunken, ancient cities!

    Download Episode (10.6 MB, 11.7 minutes)

    Show notes:
    Microbe of the episode: Actinomadura luteofluorescens

    News item 1/News item 2

    Journal Paper:
    Andrews JE, Stamatakis MG, Marca-Bell A, Stewart C, Millar IL. 2016. Exhumed hydrocarbon-seep authigenic carbonates from Zakynthos Island (Greece): Concretions not archaeological remains. Marine and Petroleum Geology 76:16–25.

    Other interesting stories:
  • Insecticide-resistant insects have insecticide-degrading gut bacteria (paper)
  • Microbe spores that can survive in space
  • Fungus-gardening ants are choosy about how much CO2 they want in their gardens (paper)
  • Biochar helps microbes transfer electrons around in soil
  • Exposure of infants to furry pets affects microbiota

  • Post questions or comments here or email to bacteriofiles@gmail.com. Thanks for listening!

    Subscribe: iTunes, RSS, Google Play. Support the show at Patreon, or check out the show at Twitter or Facebook.

    Monday, July 3, 2017

    BacterioFiles 300 - Hyphae Help Horizontal (Gene Transfer)

    Oyster mushroom mycelium
    By Tobi Kellner, CC BY-SA 3.0
    This episode: Filament-forming organisms help bacteria swim through soil and exchange genes with each other! Also, new feature: microbe of the episode!

    Download Episode (13.2 MB, 14.4 minutes)

    Show notes:
    Microbe of the episode: Azotobacter vinelandii

    News item

    Video of bacteria swimming along mycelium:


    Full statement from Tom Berthold

    Journal Paper:
    Berthold T, Centler F, H├╝bschmann T, Remer R, Thullner M, Harms H, Wick LY. 2016. Mycelia as a focal point for horizontal gene transfer among soil bacteria. Sci Rep 6:36390.

    Other interesting stories:
  • Bacterial DNA reduces mouse airway allergies
  • Changes in microbiomes of people in 500-day space simulation (paper)
  • Using advanced electron microscopy to visualize giant virus
  • Bacterial predators find prey by both being trapped by their own whirlpools
  • Many unusual viruses are moving around in the fluids of the rocky ocean floor

  • Post questions or comments here or email to bacteriofiles@gmail.com. Thanks for listening!

    Subscribe: iTunes, RSS, Google Play. Support the show at Patreon, or check out the show at Twitter or Facebook.